The ACS Blog

Strategic thinking, business war games, and strategy simulations

The Top Pricer Tournament

Can You Out-strategize a Couple Thousand People? The Top Pricer Tournament™ is a state-of-the-art business simulation that pits your pricing strategies against those from 1,780 (as of November 2018) other people from around the world. With 1,780 entrants, the Tournament runs 8½ billion simulations to see whose strategies work best. It is not an Excel […]

ACS on LinkedIn

Some of these essays are about competitive strategy and strategic thinking; some are not. “Are Capitalists Copping Out?” “We Will Play Soothing, Uninterrupted Music While You Wait.” “The Formerly United States of America.” And more.

ACS on Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review (HBR.org) has posted essays by ACS’ Mark Chussil. Here are links.

Uber: Or, What’s Kosher in Competing?

Two takes on Uber and its high-profile, highly controversial tactics. Who’s the bad guy, Uber, Lyft, or the media?

Betting on Halos

Would you invest in a business with good fundamentals but (currently) bad performance, or a business with bad fundamentals but (currently) good performance? In other words, are you a gambler?

Did You Win or Did They Lose?

How do upstarts win? Why do incumbents lose? Upstarts can only win if incumbents let themselves lose.

The Track-Record Fallacy

How do we know when someone is skillful at competing? The thing is, it’s hard to tell the difference between luck and skill…

We’ll See How Smart Mark Zuckerberg Is

The future judgment by the pundits about the outcome of Mr. Zuckerberg’s bet on WhatsApp will be wrong in the same sense that it is wrong to say playing Russian roulette is a good decision if it has a good outcome.

Rat Beats Human

No one — well, no human — says a rat is smarter than a human; yet, in an experiment, rat beats human. Why? How? The rat isn’t doing anything a human can’t. The rat is doing something a human won’t.

62% Raisin Bran

There’s a theory of competing behind the baloney on a company’s box of cereal. It seems not to fit the company’s number-one corporate value: “We do the right thing, all the time.”